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Archive for the ‘e-publishing’ Category

ddc6c2b2e0870ad8986ce2.L._V201243649_SX200_My next guest in this Authors Helping Authors series is best-selling author Sherry Gloag, a transplanted Scot now living in the beautiful coastal countryside of Norfolk, England.  Sherry and I ‘met’ through our mutual involvement in the Internet Writing Workshop.  I invited Sherry to share some insights and experiences.

Welcome, Sherry. To give the audience some perspective, tell us how many books you’ve written.

Taking your question literally, I have written about fifteen books, nine of which have been published so far. Five of those books were submitted and rejected.  I lost those manuscripts during a PC changeover, and they were never re-worked or submitted again.  Of the nine books published so far, one of those, The Brat, was rejected by a big-name publisher of romances here in the UK, but was accepted by The Wild Rose Press a couple of months later.

 Have all fifteen been in the same genre? 

No. I write contemporary romances with a dash of mystery and, at most, one to three flames. Within that category, I have written both full-length novels and some novellas.  Two of my other novels are Regency Romances. One, Vidal’s Honor, enjoyed best-seller status on both Amazon, and Amazon UK, for several weeks.

A great many authors don’t feel they’ve actually made any headway until they’ve subbed to agents or been published. When did you first feel you could call yourself ‘a writer’?

Before I was published I called myself an ‘aspiring author’.  That made me feel my goal was more feasible.  I’ve had to think back for this one, and don’t know, for sure, that I ever described myself as a writer. Don’t ask me why!

How did you go about get your first book published? 

The Wild Rose Press  published The Brat in October 2010. I tried a leading UK publisher of category romances early in 2010 without success. I then offered a whole revision of the story to The Wild Rose Press a couple of months later. The editor, who was absolutely charming, declined it too, but offered a host of suggestions, including trying another category within TWRP.

Many writers would’ve taken the rejection and not resubmitted, but you did and were successful?

Yes, I followed the suggestions and met with success, but I didn’t do that the first time it happened to me.

So, there’s advice you would give your ‘younger self’?

Yes,  when a leading UK publisher of romance rejected a manuscript with a note offering suggestions for improvement, I should’ve recognized that as an invitation to rework the story and then submit it again. Sadly, I missed out twice on that one for lack of knowledge. So it follows on I would also advise my younger self (and all new writers) not to give up. Even though it wasn’t so much a case of giving up, as lack of knowing the form, at the time. Also my younger self would have benefited from realizing that just because certain members of the family didn’t take me seriously, I should have ignored them and believed in myself.

Where do your story ideas come from? 

Anywhere and everywhere. It could be a phrase that pops into my head. A snippet of overheard conversation. Something seen on TV – don’t watch that much so it’s not a big source of ideas. – A picture or a tune may inspire me, but quite often the characters or an ideal title may come to mind and I ‘go from there’.

How has your method of publication and/or writing changed over the years?

In the three years since The Brat was published I think my writing has changed. I’d like to think it has improved. It’s hard to analyse the changes in my writing, but I think it is edgier.

Do you have a favorite among your titles? 

My favourite book is usually the one I am writing. That said, The Brat, Duty Calls, From Now Until Forever and Vidal’s Honor are all close to my heart. The first two because they took much more time to write, and I fell totally in love with my characters. The other two, because my heroines were gut-deep strong women. They both constantly surprised me with their actions and solutions to the obstructions I put in their path.

Which of your works has outperformed the others and why do you think this is?

Vidal’s Honor quickly became a best selling book. I’d like to say it’s because of my writing, the story content and the plot, but I have to acknowledge that the stunning book cover plays a great deal in the success of the book. When I take the printed copies on my books to fairs it is always the cover of Vidal’s Honor that draws the most comments and interest and also generates the most sales.

With all this success, one would have to guess that you’re very disciplined about your writing. How much time do you spend writing? Do you plot your stories ahead of time? 

I’d like to say I have a set time of day for writing. I used to. But sadly this year has been – on the writing front, at least – disruptive, disjointed, and at times downright disenchanting due to ‘life’ getting in the way and dropping several other issues and commitments into my lap.  I seriously hope 2014 reverts back to a more fluent writing routine for me.  No, I don’t plot my stories ahead of writing. I do, though, as I write one chapter make a series of notes about events I intend for the nest one.

 What would you tell aspiring authors about the best way to reach readers?

Promotion is an essential part of a writer’s life these days, and for me, one of the most traumatic. And yes, I do mean, traumatic! Like many other writers, I am a solitary person and the promotional aspect of writing is more than hard for me to come to terms with. As always, I keep promising myself I will improve, and once again I am looking to 2014 to see major inroads to my attempts to improve on this.

 I don’t think you’re alone with those fears, Sherry. Many writers dread the marketing aspect of being an author — myself included. What are you working on now?

At the moment, due to events throughout this year, I have done something new. I have several writing projects on the go, so if I get stuck with one, I can move to another. SO of the eight projects in my files, I am working on two of them more than the others. Born Again is a hard hitting story with a romance woven through it. It has involved a ton of research and is constantly changing direction. So when that becomes a pain, I switch to another project which incorporates a series of stories under an umbrella title based around myths and superstitions. The stories are varied. Some are pure romance; others have romance in the background, while others are downright different. I’m enjoying working with this one.

Considering the amount of books published every year, why should readers buy your books?

Because one reviewer described my writing as ‘having a ‘unique voice while maintaining and upholding the characters and story.’ Others have described my writing as ‘gentle, almost poetic, while handling hard-hitting subjects while upholding the true romance within the tale.’

There is a saying, and I paraphrase it here…”The first chapter sells the book, the last chapter sells the next one.” I’d like to think that my readers like my writing enough to look out for my next book. My latest book, entitled Name The Day, was published by Astraea Press and is available from many online outlets including Amazon, Amazon UK, Barnes and Noble 

Sherry’s latest news is her short story contribution, Queen of Diamond, to a fifteen author anthology called Love and Diamonds.  Released February 6, 2014, it can be found at  Amazon  or  Amazon UK .Love and Diamonds

Sherry Gloag’s writing resume attests to the success achieved through tenacity. She didn’t let initial rejection stop her from pursuing the career she wanted. Her advice? Listen to those who offer advice and press on. Believe in yourself.

When not writing and being published (and this author is wondering when that is), Sherry escapes to her garden for “thinking time”. There, she works out the plots for her next novel. Though she enjoys “talking to her characters”, she also loves to hear from readers. You can reach Sherry at sherrygloag@gmail.com

© 2014 Robin Cain, author of THE SECRET MISS RABBIT KEPT and WHEN DREAMS BLEED 

 

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Many an author embarks upon a publishing journey armed with little more than talent, desire, and blind faith.  Unfortunately, snake oil salesmen love the rookies in this business (discussed in Part I of this Authors Helping Authors series) and my next guest learned this lesson the hard way. 

Meet mystery writer Evelyn Cullet. An aspiring author since high school, she began her first novel, Romancing A Mystery, while attending college. After years of hard work, she submitted the manuscript to multiple traditional publishers and, like many other talented writers, her efforts were met with rejection. She went on to self-publish the story. 

Evelyn,what can you tell others about your experience with self-publishing?

For my first book, Romancing A Mystery, I used an all-inclusive publishing company called Outskirts Press. It was an expensive option, but my book was published. Things went fine until I ended my contract. I wanted to re-write the book, so I asked that they remove my ebook from Kindle. They’d  set it up for me in the first place — at a price, I might add — but they informed me that, since my contract had ended, they had nothing to do with the Kindle version. They said, as the author, I had the responsibility to deal with Amazon. When I contacted Amazon, the reps told me that they could only deal with the company who set up the Kindle version. Outskirts Press refuses to help and Amazon says they are following ‘company policy’. So, it’s a “Catch 22”.  I’ve contacted both firms several times and they both say the same thing. It became so frustrating I finally gave up. It’s a big mess and there’s nothing I can do.  Getting old physical copies of that first novel off the market is impossible, too. Buyers are reselling copies on Amazon. Now it’s too late to do anything, but I am re-writing the book.

You’re rewriting Romancing A Mystery?

Yes. In retrospect, I see why it had been rejected by traditional publishers. The story had a lot of good light romance, but there wasn’t much of a mystery.

You went on to write more mysteries, but you didn’t self-publish those? 

No, I’m happy to say they were both accepted for publication by Wings ePress.  My second book, Love, Lies and Murder, is about two capricious friends who turn their small town upside down in an attempt to solve the gruesome murder of the town’s millionaire industrialist, only to discover that people are not always who they seem, and a single error in judgment can prove fatal. The third, Masterpiece of Murder, is the sequel about a heartbroken art student who follows her errant fiancé to Bariloche, Argentina. His reasons for being in Bariloche complicate her life and threaten her very existence as she unintentionally stumbles into a downward spiral of deceit, art forgery and murder. Both books are mysteries, but I’ve added light romance and a little humor.

Where do you get your story ideas?

So far, my story ideas come from my own experiences. Romancing A Mystery grew as a result of a trip to England I had planned with friends when I was twenty-four years old. I wound up getting married instead and since I couldn’t take the trip, I wrote about how it might have turned out had I gone. Most of the action in Love, Lies and Murder takes place in a small company office, much like the one where I worked when I was single — and where I had an office romance that ended badly. The idea for the Masterpiece of Murder came when I was taking art classes and met an artist who had gone to Bariloche, Argentina for a Master art class. Upon seeing the lovely photos the artist had brought back, the writer in me immediately envisioned Bariloche as a great setting for a murder mystery. And it turned out I was right.

If you could, what would you tell your ‘younger writing self’?

I’m sorry now that I didn’t work with a professional editor when I was writing my first novel. I wasted a great deal of time and expense that could have been avoided. I should have done more research before self-publishing. I also should have asked Outskirts to take the novel off of Kindle BEFORE I ended my contract. How many more mistakes could I possibly have made with that first novel? Live and learn.

You have learned. Now you enjoy a successful writing career. What’s your greatest struggle as a writer?

Finding the time to write. I thought that after I retired from my day job, I would finally have enough time, but in fact I don’t, because now I find all kinds of other things that require my attention. Marketing my novels and doing a blog are just two of them.  I just have to try and budget my time so I can get in a few hours of writing. Limiting my online time is important as well.

What do you think is the best way for authors to reach readers?

Guest blogging, doing library talks, book club talks and craft shows. I recently did a large Christmas craft show where I got a chance to talk with mystery readers who had never heard of me. I sold quite a few novels, and I passed out a lot of bookmarks to potential readers.

The experience with your first book obviously hasn’t stopped you from pursuing what you love. What are you working on now?

Right now I’m editing my next mystery, Once Upon a Crime. Containing several of the same characters mentioned in my previous novels, it’s about a newly published mystery author who goes to Michigan with her friend, to take a much needed rest. She gets anything but rest when she becomes involved with stolen gemstones, two murders, and her friend’s handsome, Machiavellian cousin. I’m working on a release date of Spring, 2014.

Evelyn is a current member of Sisters in Crime. When she’s not reading mysteries, reviewing them or writing them, she enjoys playing the piano, is an amateur Lapidary, and an organic gardener. When she’s not ‘limiting her online time’, you can find her on Facebook , Pinterest, Twitter, Goodreads, and her website.

© 2014 Robin Cain, author of THE SECRET MISS RABBIT KEPT and WHEN DREAMS BLEED

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As a relatively new contributing writer for the Examiner, I have spent the last month and half trying to learn how to juggle my time. With a requirement of 3 – 4 articles a week, the Examiner has been both great practice and great exposure, but getting my stuff read by a large audience is a tremendous amount of work. The good news is that it has given me a huge insight into what it will really take to be a successful published author. Networking and becoming a ‘brand’ borders on a full-time job.

As some of you may know, I have a novel I have been ‘shopping’ for months and months now. Always a dream of mine to go the ‘traditional’ publishing route, my learning curve on this project has been huge. After all this time, (and more responses than I care to admit that tell me “thank you, but our agency is not taking on any more clients at this time”), I am centimeters away from finally realizing that POD/self-publishing may be the only way to see my novel in print within my lifetime. Sigh…

When I began this journey, “self-published” had the connotation of “my writing sucks, I can’t get an agent and so I have to go this route”. I have now read books from tremendously talented people who have gone this route and I have to admit, I am pleasantly surprised. With the literary world fighting harder to make a buck and more and more authors trying to get published for the first time, POD and Ebooks seem to honestly be a more viable and economically feasible alternative. Whether one goes traditional or another route, an author has to fight tooth and nail to get his name and product out there, so why not reap greater financial benefits for doing the same amount of work?

I’m convinced that the only way for this to succeed is to continually market, network and support those authors who have opted to go the ‘non-traditional’ route. My reading list now contains up-and-coming authors I find on Facebook, those who have opted for smaller publisher/distributors and those going the self-published route. I am making a conscious effort to reach out to those that have traveled my same difficult road and encountered the same ‘bumps’. I can only hope that one day, when my novel is out, others will do the same.

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The  question nowadays – with any author trying to get something published – is whether or not traditional publishing is truly the best method anymore.

With enough patience, information and very little money (relatively speaking), an author can literally have their work selling on Amazon in a few short months. If they choose e-publishing, their work could be ‘out there’ within days. Of course, there isn’t the exposure  or status that goes along with a big-name publisher, but there isn’t the loss of percentage either. Nor is there the inevitable wait to see something in print. Many, many options exist today between big-name publishers and e-publishing.

 So…how does today’s author make that decision?

Many authors opt to assume all the risk themselves the moment their manuscript is complete. There are others that do so only after the arduous ‘query’ journey. What separates the two groups? 

An author’s most difficult task is the promotion after a book is in print. The task of promotion exists no matter the route, so what makes an author choose one versus the other? Does it come down to ego? A balance-sheet sensibility? Or is it a case of allowing success or failure with big-name publishers to determine one’s path? 

Is the real goal of every author to publish with, say, a Simon and Schuster and only when that fails do they go another route? Or is the industry changing so much and technology making things so much easier that the other options are now the only ones that make any real sense?

This inquiring mind would love to hear your thoughts.

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